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Sepsis

On this page you can find information about what sepsis is, what are the signs and symptoms to keep an out for and how can it lead to amputation. It also contains information about services available to support you with the consequences of sepsis and Corrine Hutton’s (quad amputee due to sepsis and Charity Founder) experience of life after amputation due to sepsis.

Sepsis

On this page you can find information about what sepsis is, what are the signs and symptoms to keep an out for and how can it lead to amputation. It also contains information about services available to support you with the consequences of sepsis and Corrine Hutton’s (quad amputee due to sepsis and Charity Founder) experience of life after amputation due to sepsis.

Sepsis is one of the conditions that may lead to amputation.

Corrine Hutton (https://www.corinnehutton.com/bio), a quad amputee and founder of the Finding Your Feet charity in Glasgow in collaboration with Katie Dutton, a sepsis survivor, student nurse and Student Nursing Times Awards & RCNi Awards Finalist, joined their experience and knowledge to provide us with information about sepsis.

This page is still a work in progress, however you can check out some of the videos that Corrine has created for you.

What is sepsis?

SEPSIS, also known as blood poisoning, is the reaction to an infection in which the body attacks its own organs and tissues.

-- The UK Sepsis Trust

Check out this video, where Corrine Hutton talks about how she got sepsis and how this affected her life.

Signs of sepsis

Learning the signs and symptoms of sepsis can help prevent severe septic shock and may save somebody’s life.

Being aware of the possible signs of sepsis is crucial in early identification. It is important to know that there is not just one sign of sepsis. Sepsis can be mistaken with flu, gastroenteritis or chest infection as they share similar signs and symptoms.

Symptoms may include:

People who are developing sepsis may have just 1 or all 7 of the above signs, and it’s important to rule sepsis out before considering other causes.

Always think: #coulditbesepsis

Treatment for sepsis may include:

Sepsis NEEDS to be treated as a medical emergency

The above treatment should be started within one hour of admission to hospital. If you suspect sepsis please ensure the staff at the emergency department are aware of your concerns.

Delay in treatment can be the difference between life and death, and the need for amputations. The quicker sepsis is treated, the more a person will have a full recovery.

More information on sepsis is available at the UK Sepsis Trust for relatives, patients and healthcare professionals.

#coulditbesepsis

How can sepsis lead to amputation?

Sepsis is one of the main causes of amputation, alongside Diabetes, Peripheral Arterial Disease and cancer.

We all have a blood clotting mechanism but when sepsis occurs, this can go into overdrive. The organs begin to fail, and the blood becomes more clotted. This can stop the blood supply to areas of the body. If tissue doesn’t receive the blood it needs, and the oxygen within the blood, it begins to die.

Amputation will be necessary to prevent this spreading to other areas of the body. Sometimes amputations can be fingers/toes however many require full leg or arm amputations. This can be very difficult to comprehend, especially during the recovery stages.

Check out Corrine Hutton’s video where she talks about how sepsis affected her, but also what other consequences one can/may expect:

Life after amputation

Amputation is a life changing event! Physical recovery is as important as finding the coping mechanisms that work for you to maintain or regain mental and emotional wellbeing.

Check out Corrine Hutton’s video on how being a quad amputee affected her life and how she has found purpose after the amputation.


This page has been created courtesy of:
Corrine Hutton, quad amputee due to sepsis and founder of Finding your Feet
Katie Dutton, sepsis survivor, student nurse, Student Nursing Times Awards and RCNi Awards Finalist